Monday, June 20, 2011

What language does your animal speak?

Did you know that Russian animals make different noises than American animals?
Okay, so maybe they don't but they are different in the two languages. 

Jon and I have been battling about this for years now – and neither one of us is willing to give in.

Sitting 005

A dog says “Woof” or “Gahf-gahf.”  (Honestly, when have you ever heard a dog Woof?)

Sitting 012

A horse says “Neigh” or “EE-go-go.”  (You go long on the “eeeee” and quick on the go-go").

Sitting 019

A frog says “Ribbit” or “Kva-kva-kva.”  (I dare you to show me a frog that says “Ribbit”).


Sitting 024

A pig says “oink-oink” or “khryoo-khryoo.”  (You gotta do this sound through the nose, kinda like the pig does).

Sitting 049

Honestly, how is this even an argument?  Obviously, the Russian animals are right.

Sitting 092

Do you speak another language?  Are animal sounds different?
Did you just try to make the Russian noises?

13 comments:

  1. First, love the pictures!! She is so freakin' cute! Second, I am STILL laughing about the animal sounds and have been repeatedly doing them for Adam all weekend ;) I love your Russianness!! :)

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  2. Busted, I was totally trying to sounds out the Russian sounds out loud. Thankfully my husband was not in hearing range. I remember thinking the British animal sounds made more sense than the American ones, but I can't for the life of me remember what they were.

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  3. I`m from NZ so the sounds are pretty similar to the American ones, but now I live in Japan, where the noises are really different...
    a crow - kaa kaa
    a rooster - kokekokko
    a cat - nyaa nyaa
    a dog - wan wan
    a frog - kero kero

    Interesting, and I agree that frogs definitely don`t say `ribbit`!!

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  4. omg, I can't even handle it. It would have been a billion times better if you'd done a video for each of you doing the sounds :)

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  5. When I was living in Brazil, I was amazed at how different the animal noises are. So interesting!

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  6. Admittedly, I did think the Russian sounds made more sense when I learned them. But the most inaccurate language? French. Cocorico for the rooster? REALLY?

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  7. Love those pictures and Addi looks like she is telling you how it is goin gto be in the last one.

    I haven't really heard animal noises in other languages, but I do know that the English version of NO is not working with Molly. So maybe she'd understand it in Russian! lol

    And VIDEO PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  8. Sweetest pics :-)
    In German it´s like this:

    a dog - wau wau
    a horse... um. Difficult. No idea. Wiehern is the word for describing it
    a frog - quak quak (Ribbit?!!)
    a pig. Hm... quiek-quiek? (Gotta ask SIL!)

    a cow says muhhh
    and a rooster kikerikie
    a cat will go miau

    Funny how differently it´s pronounced!

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  9. LOL!! I am also voting on the video version. . . ya know, just so we can all hear the difference for ourselves. Until then, I'm not voting! :-)

    BTW, love the last pic of Addi.

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  10. HAHAHAHA! This is hilarious! I never even thought that the animal sounds would be different in other countries...of course, it makes so much sense that they are though.

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  11. Haha! :) I can't pick sides here, but I will say that animals do understand different languages (I used to talk to my dog in Spanish), so maybe they do sound different in different places! ;)

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  12. This is so funny b/c I remember learning the animal noises in French class and thinking, "Why do French animals make different sounds?" LOL

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  13. In French, dogs say "ouah ouah", horses say "hhiiii", and my favorite is that pigs say "groin groin"

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